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The Cure for Dieting: All About Intuitive Eating With Stephanie Dodier

Welcome to Episode 3 of Season 7 of The PCOS Revolution Podcast:

The Cure for Dieting: All About Intuitive Eating With Stephanie Dodier

What is your personal relationship with food? Is it positive? Is it negative? How might your personal relationship with food be impacting other areas of your life?

This week on PCOS Revolution Podcast, I am having a conversation with Stephanie Dodier. Stephanie is a nutritionist, emotional eating expert, founder of the Beyond the Food Academy and host of Beyond the Food Show. She helps women stop overeating and emotional eating, find food freedom and end food obsession. Today we are discussing how you relate to food.

Diets come and go and ultimately they are not successful. Stephanie had her first diet at 12. That mentality and cycle continued until she was 38. Part of the issue was because of the weight cycling, the yoyo dieting. When Stephanie started in the world of natural health, food was presented as the solution to everything. She struggled with binge eating and disordered eating, becoming totally obsessed with food. She started to explore a new facet of relationship with food. From there she discovered the world of intuitive eating. Since then, she has helped and continues to help people mend their relationship with food, eater better and feel better without dieting.

During this episode, Stephanie will share various tips about how to improve your relationship with food. It all starts with shifting to internal cues and listening to what your body is trying to tell you. Weight is not a disease – it’s a symptom of something else going on in the body. Anytime there is restriction of food, that will be received by your brain as a threat to your survival. When we impose rules, our brain goes into defense mode.

While dieting is common, weight cycling is linked to higher inflammation in the body and weight gain. Diets have a 95 percent failure rate. We aren’t born dieting, we are born an intuitive eater. At a certain place we were led to believe our body wasn’t ideal and were given the tool of dieting. This feeds the fundamental notion that you are broken. We start getting out of our body and start following external cues. Your capacity as an intuitive eater never goes away, you just have to learn how to access it. Many women don’t even know there is an option to not be on a diet.

To be successful, it’s  important  to start disconnecting from diet environments. Social media can be harmful as well. You can get inundated with external cues of eating, making it difficult to reconnect. Intuitive eating is a journey that fosters the ability to be in your body. Stephanie incorporates mindfulness in her teachings to help bring oneself back into the body.

READ the full transcript here:

Read Full Transcript

Farrar Duro
Well, hello everyone and welcome back to the PCOS Revolution Podcast. I am very excited today to have Stephanie Dodier with us. She’s a nutritionist, emotional eating expert, founder of the Beyond the Food Academy, and host of the Beyond the Food Show. Stephanie’s integrative and comprehensive approach help women to stop overeating, and emotional eating and free themselves from diets and food obsession. And we’re going to discuss today how you relate to food because diets come and go and a lot of diets are not successful. We’re going to talk about why that is, and how to improve your relationship with food. So welcome, Stephanie. I’m so glad to have you on.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
I’m very excited to be with your listeners and yourself as well.

Farrar Duro
Thank you. So tell me a little bit about what got you into, um, you definitely have an interesting background where you worked at a Fortune 500 company and what led you to work with food and and offering this integrative approach.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
So for me, it’s very simple. It’s my own journey. And at the end, it’s the end of it, the crash, the low point of my story is at 36 when I collapsed on stage. And from that point forward, I was looking for a solution for five diagnose condition I had which was depression, anxiety, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and a high level of inflammation in the body. And I didn’t want to do medication because it was offered to me five prescription when I left the hospital that day. And that wasn’t resonating with me. So I went on to a search of finding other option and then unfolded in front of me the world of natural health, which included food as a medium for me to heal my body. And I went down that path with a history of dieting for about 25 years. My first life was at 12, and it carried on until about the age of 38. When I realized that part of your issue, why I was always dieting and why I was getting sicker and sicker was because of the weight cycling yo yo dieting that I had been on all of my life. And when I started in the world of natural health, food was presented to me as the solution to everything. Right and many of our natural practitioners do that. And it got me to a point of binge eating and disordered eating behavior where I was completely obsessed with food, not necessarily from a weight loss perspective, but from a health perspective. So that got me to explore a whole new facet of my relationship to food. And then from that on, I discovered the world of intuitive eating, and I’ve been helping women since then healing their relationship to food to get them to a place of eating better, feeling better, being healthier, without being on the diets.

Farrar Duro
Well, And that, to me is the key. Because so many times with PCOS, women are told to just go ahead and lose the weight and everything will improve. And you know, the insulin will improve, the ovulation will improve, and that sort of thing. So when you look at, you know, what can be done to improve that, that outlook with in a way of like looking at long term? Where do you recommend women start?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
So here’s the first foundation of intuitive eating. It’s about moving from external cues about food and about your health to internal cues. So we’ll bring that into the context of PCOS, right? PCOS is a bunch of symptoms, it’s a collective of symptoms. And we like to see it as a way in which your body is talking to you, instead of being something that you are afflicted with that’s coming into your way to make your life miserable that you need to control. What if we simply look at this and say, What is my body trying to tell me? Right? The same thing with the weight, weight is not a disease, it’s a symptom of something else going on into your body. And yes, food as a role to play in this. But it’s many other health behaviors , which I know that you look at that when you work with your patients. So when we look at health, and we look at food, it’s about learning to tap in to our internal cue and becoming a relationship or becoming in a relationship with our body and with our hunger and with our relationship to food. Does that make sense?

Farrar Duro
I definitely think that’s true. And the outlook is really important. So, I guess talk a little bit about keto. And what is I guess some of the roadblocks you might see with diets long term such as as not only keto, but you know, a severely low carb diet or or other ones out there.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Yeah. So let’s take diet in general. So one of the thing that the listener needs to understand is any type of food restriction that it is calories or macro, because we’re going now for the last about five years into our world of macro restricting, because we know that calorie in and calorie out don’t work. So we’re instead we’re limiting food group, any type of restriction around food will be perceived by your brain, particularly your subconscious brain, your reptilian part of your brain as a threat to your survival. Because we are wired to eat food that is around us and eat it to satisfaction to fullness to society. And when we start imposing rules, external rules, our brain goes in defense mechanism. So no matter what diet people try, there is a 95% failure rate that is clear statistical results. The problem and what I see in what I want to say 99% of women, when they go on diet, they fail. They think it’s their problem. It’s them doing something wrong, not the diet, and he keeps cycling through diet in and out where comes the term, yo yo dieting, which causes health issue, like weight cycling, is linked to higher inflammation in the body, weight Cycling is actually linked to weight gain. So that is why diets don’t work.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
They have a 95% failure rate. And they also increase symptom in the body and in our health. So what if we weren’t dieting, but we were instead going back to our most natural state of engagement with food, which is to follow our inner cue or hunger, fullness, satisfaction, which are built in within us as human. If you ever watch a baby feeding, right for all the moms, you know how it works, right baby cry, you very quickly learned that you got to feed that baby that cry or change the diaper this some kind of need associated with that cry. And the baby learned that when I cry, I get fed. So you feed the baby. And then when the baby is full, the baby stop and pushes with his thumb, either the breast or the bottle. That is fullness a cue, right. And as the child grows up, it starts selecting food. And a toddler will select food on their plate of what they like. That’s the satisfaction cue. We are born intuitive eaters. The problem that most of us have encountered is that we were intuitive eaters.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
And at a certain place, typically between the age of 10 and 18. somehow, somewhere we were led to believe that our body wasn’t ideal wasn’t thin enough was in like shape accordingly to whatever culture we come from. And then we were given the tool of dieting. With the tool of dieting, there’s this fundamental notion that you’re broken, you should not listen to your hunger, fullness and satisfaction to that you need to follow the guru or the diet rules. And then we start getting out of our body. And then starting following external cues. Now here’s the good news. Your capacity as an intuitive eater never goes away. It’s part of your DNA, it’s part of your genetic, there’s always that little fire burning inside of you. So that you are able to heal your relationship to food and then grow your capacity to tap into your hunger, fullness and satisfaction, then being able to disconnect from diet and external rules.

Farrar Duro
Okay, good. So being on a diet, I think that makes a lot of sense, can actually hinder our own internal cues is what you’re saying slowly. So no matter what it is, you’re ignoring those cues. We had a doctor by the name of Paul Magarelli on our show, I guess it was about a year ago. And he said that women with PCOS are really the perfect woman. Because in evolutionary terms,you know, your body, actually, it was a benefit to maintain that fat. So we store up the fat, and we you know, when food was plentiful, and summertime, and then winter came and you know, that’s how we survived, right, that’s how human existence came to be. Because we were able to store the body fat and that to the body, it storing fat is is a wonderful thing. So I think that you know, that’s true. And we we look at that. Now, today, we don’t have an end to that because through we have food 365 days a week. But here sorry. But you know, going into that, now we need to learn how to reconnect with that. So you’re saying?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. So we, we do have this ability, we need to, first of all, we need to be aware of everything I just was explaining, most women don’t even know that they have an option of not being on a diet, it’s so fundamentally rolled into our head, that we think there’s no other option. And when we’re not on a diet, we feel shame, we feel guilt, we feel all the bad feelings. So first of all, know that you have an option, then second, start disconnecting from diet environment. And social media is very dangerous for that, particularly with the most trendy a diet right now, which happens to be keto five years ago with paleo, you can get inundated with external cues of eating 15-20 times a day, making it difficult for you to spend the time to reconnect inside of you. So it is a journey that must be done in an environment that foster disability that you have to be in your body and, and connect with your cues.

Farrar Duro
That’s so true. And I hope that if you’re listening right now, I want you to really key into this right now is that it’s not about finding the right diet. It’s really not, I think it’s about finding what’s right for you, and how you feel. And we have a food is mood journal in our 90 day reset program that we have, that you know, it’s basically journaling about how you feel after you’re eating certain things. Because some people respond really well to certain foods and others, they just definitely don’t. So I think it’s individual, and that’s the work involved is really paying attention to that.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. So you’re doing some form of intuitive eating and that program in which you’re telling your patients to tap into the internal cue, in this case, their mood to then be have an indication of what they should and shouldn’t eat. Right. So that’s a form of intuitive eating, we can expand that to say mood, how your digestion work, your level of energy, your motivation, like all those internal cues will say perhaps for someone that is of the cultural background that has perhaps a lot of rice in their diet, I’m thinking of an Asian background, you know what rice does well for you, but for the person who doesn’t have that in their history, perhaps that doesn’t do well. That’s how you were able to know what’s good and not good for you by tapping into that connection with your body.

Farrar Duro
So true, and sometimes I feel like oh, I’m craving a certain food that is rich in iron. And low and behold, I’m low in iron. So like my body’s telling me that that’s important. And that happens with a lot of our patients will say I knew that. I was craving that for some reason, you know, and we do the blood work. And we go yeah, you definitely needed that. So it’s B vitamins, vitamin D, all those things. And we always say food is the first medicine. That’s from Hippocrates. So, so many things. So I think having that, like you said, kind of ignoring some of the social media that’s out there. That’s so so focused on on diets. I mean, how do you do that? Where do you start, you just turn it off? Or?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Well, there’s a whole subculture come and join my world, right. So if you join, if you come and see me on social media, or you listen to my podcast, you will find that we have an entire subculture, what’s called anti diet or intuitive eating, or Holistic Health background, where there’s millions of us out there right now not promoting diet, but promoting internal cues to know when to eat, what to eat, and how much to eat. The challenge is, and I’m going to go into a little bit of politics here. This movement of anti diet is not something that is forefront because we go against the weight loss industry. And the weight loss industry is a $67 billion business last year. In a united state alone. We don’t sell the supplements, we don’t sell the books, we’re not part of like the keto way.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
So, our message does not tend to go up front. So you kind of have to search and then you will discover a whole world of people like me, who will help you reconnect with your body. The other thing that I want to talk about, if you don’t mind is the whole segment of body image. Because the driving force for women to enter the diet cycle is body image. And then perhaps perhaps later down the road, a disease is developed or diagnose. But the entering point of dieting is body image. So we must also work on or renegotiate our relationship to our body. And we like to approach it from the angle of body neutrality, instead of body positivity. Because for most women who have cycled through diet, their whole life being in a non ideal body, has been very damaging. And very traumatic, there are studies that are starting to come out with weight stigma, as being in the same damage or the same effect on our nervous system and to our mental health as would be sexual trauma. So this the weight sigma, that body image that we’re carrying inside of us, is perhaps as damaging as dieting, so we need to heal that relationship, we do it from a place of neutrality. So, we move away from shame into a world of neutrality, and then we can stay there for the rest of our life. It’s about seeing our body, it’s neither good or bad. Our body is a tool, it’s the vehicle into which we go through life, it’s our partner, it’s not a tool for which we achieve self worth or self esteem either way, good or bad. It’s about being in a relationship of care with this vehicle that we have.

Farrar Duro
So well said and I think that we tend to look at the media so much, and commercials and ads. And there. I mean, honestly, you can’t avoid seeing this. I took my daughter to the mall one time, and when she was really young, and we said that, you know, we walk past victoria secret. And I said, you know, those are airbrushed, right? Those are not those are not real. I mean, you know, I just think that making sure that we teach young girls that really like, you know, this is not reality. There’s Photoshop out there, there’s so much of that. And, and that’s hard, it’s really hard when they’re surrounded by that. So, it’s that you are beautiful, how you are. And if you are surrounding yourself with people that are not appreciating you, and they’re not telling you that then it’s time to, to really look elsewhere, I think. And so where as far as when somebody is trying to get in connection with their internal cues and that sort of thing besides journaling? What’s a good way to start with that? I mean, do you, you know, look at maybe, you know, connecting with the program to help you or what, what do you do?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
So we teach mindfulness. So I’ll get to your question, we do have some tools to help women here. But I want to say this, intuitive journaling, it’s great, we also use the breath. So the simple act, and I don’t want to call it meditation, because the meditation is tinted with all kinds of like spiritual stuff, we’re going to go into the context of a mindfulness practice, which has been studies and research in the medical field as being very effective for your mental health and your emotional health. So, the breath is a simple act of breathing, so we teach it, we call it the crave your formula, in which we teach women to just simply close their eyes, bring attention to their breath, in and out by the nose, and then scan their body up and down. It could be as short as five minutes, it could be as long as 10 minutes or 15 minutes.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
But it’s about literally physically coming back into your body. It’s a free tool, it doesn’t cost anything, and it’s not linked to any religion is simply the breath into your body. So if you want to get started with this world of reconnecting to your body, getting off the diet roller coaster, becoming friends, perhaps an intuitive eater, and re establishing a new relationship to your body image, we have a tool that’s called the intuitive eating starting guide. And I’m going to give you the link to put in your show notes. Or you can come to my website, stephaniedodier.com/intuitiveeatingguide, totally free, five days, five videos, five page PDF, and we’re going to take you through the basics and then from there, we have a paid program after to help you implement that in your life.

Farrar Duro
Very cool. We’ll definitely link to that in our show notes. And I think this is great. It’s so unique, your approach and you know, I think that women are really looking for this not just another diet or something that you know, they see themselves setting themselves up for failure as so often happens. And and being you know, diagnosed with PCOS also means that glucose and insulin are so important to a majority of women with PCOS are going to be insulin resistant. So it is important to find that balance of PCOS friendly foods. I remember, you know, growing up, I definitely knew that foods were not agreeing with me, I didn’t feel good when I ate a lot of sweets and refined carbs. But as a teenager, that’s just how it works sometimes in college in high school. And so it wasn’t until I learned how to eat for my own body, that I actually started feeling better, and I had energy and my moods were so much better. So I think that it’s so key to really clue into your own body, and not listen to just what everybody else is doing.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
It’s because intuitive eating is are humain natural state, that’s what you’re doing. You’re describing intuitive eating, it can be done with any condition, because it’s going to drive you to the food formula that is right for where you are right now and help you heal. So it can be done with PCOS with anything that your body is giving you symptoms for when you get into and you’ll be able to know what’s right and not for you.

Farrar Duro
So one quick question about fasting. I don’t know if this ever comes up in your program or what we talked about. Intermittent Fasting is pretty popular for you know, reversal diabetes and women who want to lose weight with PCOS, they often are told to give it a try. So what what is your view on that?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Intermittent fasting when a woman comes from a world of dieting is further enhancing the disconnection from the body because you’re forcing yourself to say no, no, no, no, you’re not hungry, you’re not hungry until a specific external cue of time on your watch or your whatever your timing yourself. That said, when you become an experience, intuitive eater, and you know the food that works and don’t work for you, there is mornings where I don’t feel hungry, there is mornings where I only have a coffee, not because I have to intermittent fast, but because naturally, perhaps I had a big meal the night before or for whatever reason I’m not hungry that morning. So the concept of intermittent fasting, I think is natural to the human being, but can be extremely dangerous with women that have a dieting history or poor relationship to food.

Farrar Duro
It’s true, we see sometimes that window extending more and more where in some cases we see they’re only eating five hours out of the day. So at that point, when does that become an eating disorder is what it is, you know, it’s pretty close to it, I think so we have to be careful.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Well, so there’s there’s the world of I don’t know if you heard the term “diet culture”, which is this whole, like for the last 40 years, as a society, we live in a world that Bodily thinness was the ideal to be achieved. And the new generation, the teenager today are refusing to fit in that model. And that’s why body positivity is exploding right now, right? Because the young people are like, screw this, I don’t want this. But what’s also happening is, the traditional diet culture model, like take weight watchers, for example, is picking up on the fact that the younger generation doesn’t want to buy into a weight loss strategy. So they’re moving to this World of Wellness diet. So recently, weight watcher has changed their brand, from Weight Watchers to wellness that works, that was done in the last 18 months. So now we’re seeing a program like intermittent fasting that are saying you’re not doing it for the weight loss, you’re doing it to regulate your insulin resistance or decrease your blood glucose, when in fact, it is a diet, it’s just rebranded under this wellness thing. So just be careful on that.

Farrar Duro
And, and, you know, I think that our emotions impact also, obviously, all these things, and we’re trying to stuff down, you know, the loneliness or the lack of with you know, substituting that with food. And, and that’s something that sometimes we’re just not aware of a lot of times, so just ignoring your body cue, that’s completely ignoring your body cues to say, you know, I’m just going to tell myself, I’m not hungry, you know, even though I’m shaky. I think that’s probably kind of runs counterintuitive to what you’re saying. In other words.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. And so let’s talk about emotions with just a bit your emotion when you study human psychology, and neuroscience, which is the new field of psychology that is evolving, your emotion are just another cue from your body to tell you information about your environment in your life. So when we emotionally eat what we do, in fact, when you look at the anatomy of an emotion, it’s like a wave, right? It comes in, and literally, we feel it and sensation in the body, and then it breaks and it washes away. When we emotionally eat, we break the peak of the emotion by shooting dopamine into our brain with food. And then this emotion is actually never Expressed. And it keeps repeating because it never actually expresses itself to this full expansion. So emotional eating, and the suppression of emotional eating by saying no, it’s bad, don’t eat, don’t eat, actually creates this big bomb of emotion inside of our body that’s just waiting to explode. So people who try to control emotional eating with restriction or willpower often develop binge eating.

Farrar Duro
That makes total sense. And I think that this is really going to make a lot of sense to some of you guys to. If you’re trying to figure out okay, which diet is right? Or how do I start, listen, just start listening to your body. And some days you’re going to feel hungrier than others. Some days, you have to eat every two or three hours. And some days, you are not going to be as hungry, like you’re saying . And I think you’ll actually start to figure out when you’re hungry, because I think we don’t even give ourselves time sometimes to figure that out. Right? Like when you look at something asked, am I hungry? Or just do I want it? You know, I mean, is that is that good advice for someone who’s just starting with this? Or what would you say?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. So when you are hungry, right? Then you first of all, are you feeling the hunger somewhere in your body? Or is it just an automatic food obsession, and I’ll take the chocolate example. When we have an emotional eating hunger, it starts within like three to five seconds, we go from not thinking about food to obsessing about food, a specific food a specific place, and it takes over our thoughts, like all we can think about is a chocolate in the cupboard. That’s emotional eating, natural hunger grows slowly. And it’s actually a sensation that you can feel in your body, typically around your stomach and your tongue. So if you can just make that difference, then you’re like, 50% of the way through, then we have to learn a tool to normalize or regulate your emotion without actually anchoring to food. And that’s where the breath and mindfulness comes in.

Farrar Duro
So I mean, just to relate this to a personal example, we, we did a 30 day challenge for our patients a while back, and about, you know, just learning and to cue in. to, to what we’re, we’re thinking, and I really been struggling with chocolate cravings. And I realized that this was coming from, I mean, after just kind of figuring this out, it was coming from the fact that, you know, my grandmother would always cook with me. And that was a fun, happy time, you know, growing up, and she’ll cook chocolate and sweets, you know, and so it was like a comfort thing, you know, and and I think that, you know, like, in times of stress, it’s like, that’s my comfort food. And so I have to be really cognizant that, that, yeah, I’m gonna have some dark chocolate every now and then.

Farrar Duro
But I can’t use it as a crutch. And I have to figure out, you know, why that’s happening, and really get to the root of that. And until that occurred to me, it was kind of like, I didn’t even realize I was doing it. So just kind of walking into the kitchen. And, you know, or, or during the clinic, we have a little stash, you know, like, between patients, and I realized, I’m stressed out, this is what’s going on, you know, and I’m reaching for this, because it was helpful to me, at a certain point my life and it was pleasurable. And you know, it made me comfortable. So, so that’s kind of like thinking about why you’re reaching for something, it could have another meaning that goes way back? Or maybe, you know, maybe not, but have you found that in your own with your own cravings? and that sort of thing? How have you adjusted that?

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. So the example you’re giving is the power of being in our body, you’ve now identify something else that’s going on in your life that you need to perhaps work on or resolve or heal whatever you want to call it. When you become an intuitive eater, you not only get cues about your emotional state, I know for me, it was that you talked about the not good enough situation. So I was raised in a very challenging competitive environment. And nothing that I ever did was good enough. And I carry that my whole life. And that’s what actually drove my career in the corporate world. And reaching the level that I reach is because I was not doing it from a place of love. I was doing it from a place of strictly fear, right. So when we are the reason why I was able to discover that was through my craving, because every time I would get a thought or have a situation where I felt not good enough, but that I wanted to do reach out to food. Or back in the days I used to smoke, I stopped smoking at 35. But what did I do before I reach for a cigarette, I reach with some kind of numbing agent, that’s the thought me not being good enough with actually be moderated by the dopamine rush of either the cigarette or the food. So when we learn to be with our emotion, or with our symptoms, from a place of compassion, from a place of acceptance, from a place of neutrality, we can then start investigating the clue. So we can actually work at the root cause instead of symptom management.

Farrar Duro
This is so good. And I really, really appreciate you taking time to come out of here and really talk about this is such a subject that’s near and dear to my heart every you know day that we see our patients struggling with this. It’s really hard to get to the bottom of by yourself sometimes. I think you need a support group. And so Stephanie, if you could tell our listeners how to find you, and how to reach out to you that would be great.

Stephanie Dodier, CNP
Absolutely. So first place since you’re a podcast listener, you can go to iTunes, or Stitcher and find my podcast going beyond the food. That’s a great starting point, all kinds of free podcasts every week. And then from there, you can go grab your intuitive eating free course on my website and the link in the show notes here. And then from there, we’ve got coaching programs, we’ve got self study program, depending of your investment capacity, we can serve you and help you do what I just explained in half an hour in your own life.

Farrar Duro
Great. Well, thank you so much, and I really appreciate you like you and sharing your your story with us. And thank you guys for listening. We look forward to seeing you back next week and take care of yourself everyone.


Episode Spotlights:

  • What led Stephanie to work with food ([1:05])
  • Where someone should start ([3:24])
  • Roadblocks with diets long term ([5:02])
  • Going back to the most natural state with food ([6:56])
  • It’s about finding what’s right for you ([11:33])
  • Healing through neutrality ([16:02])
  • Getting back into the body ([17:47])
  • Intermittent fasting ([21:26])
  • Emotional eating ([24:46])
  • The power of being in your body ([29:03])
  • Symptom management vs diagnoses root causes ([30:12])

Resources Mentioned In This Episode:

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About the author, Farrar

Farrar Duro here, reproductive acupuncturist at Florida Complete Wellness and founder & host of The PCOS Revolution, a cutting-edge podcast where I interview PCOS experts and cysters who share their pearls of wisdom on how to kick PCOS symptoms to the curb once and for all!

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